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Black Tie International:
Jean Shafiroff Hosts Bastille Day at Le Cirque
Photos by:  Joyce brooks/Blacktiemagazine.com
Philanthropist, Jean Shafiroff.  Photo by:  Joyce Brooks/Blacktiemagazine.com

Philanthropist, Jean Shafiroff
 

Jean Shafiroff Hosts Bastille Day Luncheon 
 
Philanthropist and author Jean Shafiroff hosted a Bastille Day Luncheon for close friends on Thursday, July 13th, 2017 at Le Cirque Restaurant in New York to honor the French national holiday, Bastille Day. This holiday celebrates the unity of the French people after the Storming of the Bastille prison in Paris, France in 1789.
 
Jean Shafiroff and Zang Toi.  Photo by:  Joyce Brooks/Blacktiemaagzine,com
Jean Shafiroff and Zang Toi
Jean Shafiroff, Maggie Norris  and Zang Toi.  Photo by:  Joyce Brooks/Blacktiemaagzine.com
Jean Shafiroff, Maggie Norris  and Zang Toi
Jean Shafiroff, Marco Maccioni, Sharon Bush and Margo Langenberg.  Photo by:  Joyce Brooks/Blacktiemaagzine.com
Jean Shafiroff, Marco Maccioni, Sharon Bush and Margo Langenberg
Jean Shafiroff, and Rachel Hirschfeld.  Photo by:  Joyce Brooks/Blacktiemaagzine.com
Jean Shafiroff, and Rachel Hirschfeld
Lauren Lawrence and Maggie Norris.  Photo by:  Joyce Brooks/Blacktiemaagzine.com
Lauren Lawrence and Maggie Norris
Ann Rapp.  Photo by:  Joyce Brooks/Blacktiemagazine.com
Ann Rapp
Larry Kaiser, Geoffrey Bradfield and Craig Dix .  Photo by:  Joyce Brooks/Blacktiemaagzine.com
Larry Kaiser, Geoffrey Bradfield and Craig Dix
Lauren Lawrence, Prince Dimitri of Yugoslavia and Margo Langenberg.  Photo by:  Joyce Brooks/Blacktiemaagzine.com
Lauren Lawrence, Prince Dimitri of Yugoslavia and Margo Langenberg
Laurel Marcus.  Photo by:  Joyce brooks/Blacktiemagazinree.com
Laurel Marcus
Lieba Nesis.  Photo by:  Joyce Brooks/Blacktiemaagzine.com
Lieba Nesis
Joyce Brooks
Joyce brooks

Bastille Day
 

Storming of the Bastille, by Jean-Pierre-Louis-Laurent Houel

Storming of the Bastille[edit]

On 19 May 1789, Louis XVI invited Estates-General (les États-généraux) to air their grievances. The deputies of the Third Estate (le Tiers État), representing the common people – the two others were the Catholic clergy (clergé, Roman Catholicism being the state religion at that time) and the nobility (noblesse) – decided to break away and form a National Assembly. The Third Estate took the Tennis Court Oath (le serment du Jeu de paume, 20 June 1789), swearing not to separate until a constitution had been established. They were gradually joined by (liberal) delegates of the other estates; Louis XVI started to recognize the validity of their concerns [clarification needed] on 27 June. The assembly renamed itself the National Constituent Assembly (Assemblée nationale constituante) on 9 July.

Jacques Necker, the finance minister, who was sympathetic to the Third Estate, was dismissed on 11 July. The people of Paris then stormed the Bastille, fearful that they and their representatives would be attacked by the royal army or by foreign regiments of mercenaries in the king's service, and seeking to gain ammunition and gunpowder for the general populace. The Bastille was a fortress-prison in Paris which had often held people jailed on the basis of lettres de cachet (literally "signet letters"), arbitrary royal indictments that could not be appealed and did not indicate the reason for the imprisonment. The Bastille held a large cache of ammunition and gunpowder, and was also known for holding political prisoners whose writings had displeased the royal government, and was thus a symbol of the absolutism of the monarchy. As it happened, at the time of the attack in July 1789 there were only seven inmates, none of great political significance.[7]

The crowd was eventually reinforced by mutinous Gardes Françaises ("French Guards"), whose usual role was to protect public buildings. They proved a fair match for the fort's defenders, and Governor de Launay, the commander of the Bastille, capitulated and opened the gates to avoid a mutual massacre. However, possibly because of a misunderstanding, fighting resumed. According to the official documents, about 200 attackers and just one defender died in the initial fighting, but in the aftermath, de Launay and seven other defenders were killed, as was Jacques de Flesselles, the prévôt des marchands ("provost of the merchants"), the elected head of the city's guilds, who under the feudal monarchy also had the competences of a present-day mayor .[8]

Shortly after the storming of the Bastille, late in the evening of 4 August, after a very stormy session of the Assemblée Constituantefeudalism was abolished. On 26 August, the Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen (Déclaration des Droits de l'Homme et du Citoyen) was proclaimed (Homme with an uppercase h meaning “human”, while homme with a lowercase h means “man”).[9]

Claude Monet, Rue Montorgueil, Paris, Festival of 30 June 1878

Fête de la Fédération[edit]

The Fête de la Fédération on 14 July 1790 was a celebration of the unity of the French nation during the French Revolution. The aim of this celebration, one year after the Storming of the Bastille, was to symbolise peace. The event took place on the Champ de Mars, which was at the time far outside Paris. The place had been transformed on a voluntary[citation needed] basis by the population of Paris, in what was recalled as the Journée des brouettes ("Wheelbarrow Day").

mass was celebrated by Talleyrandbishop of Autun. The popular General Lafayette, as captain of the National Guard of Paris and a confidant of the king, took his oath to the constitution, followed by King Louis XVI. After the end of the official celebration, the day ended in a huge four-day popular feast and people celebrated with fireworks, as well as fine wine and running nude through the streets in order to display their great freedom.

Origin of the present celebration[edit]

On 30 June 1878, a feast was officially arranged in Paris to honour the French Republic (the event was commemorated in a painting by Claude Monet).[10] On 14 July 1879, there was another feast, with a semi-official aspect. The day's events included a reception in the Chamber of Deputies, organised and presided over by Léon Gambetta,[11] a military review at Longchamp, and a Republican Feast in the Pré Catelan.[12] All through France, Le Figaro wrote, "people feasted much to honour the storming of the Bastille".[13]

On 21 May 1880, Benjamin Raspail proposed a law to have "the Republic choose the 14 July as a yearly national holiday". The Assembly voted in favour of the proposal on 21 May and 8 June.[14] The Senate approved it on 27 and 29 June, favouring 14 July against 4 August (which would have commemorated the end of the feudal system on 4 August 1789). The law was made official on 6 July 1880, and the Ministry of the Interior recommended to Prefects that the day should be "celebrated with all the brilliance that the local resources allow".[this quote needs a citation] Indeed, the celebrations of the new holiday in 1880 were particularly magnificent.

In the debate leading up to the adoption of the holiday, Henri Martin, chairman of the French Senate, addressed that chamber on 29 June 1880:

Do not forget that behind this 14 July, where victory of the new era over the ancien régime was bought by fighting, do not forget that after the day of 14 July 1789, there was the day of 14 July 1790 ... This [latter] day cannot be blamed for having shed a drop of blood, for having divided the country. It was the consecration of the unity of France ... If some of you might have scruples against the first 14 July, they certainly hold none against the second. Whatever difference which might part us, something hovers over them, it is the great images of national unity, which we all desire, for which we would all stand, willing to die if necessary.

— Henri Martin, Chairman of the Sénat, 1880[15]

 

Marco Maccioni and Joyce Brooks
Marco Maccioni and Joyce Brooks
Happy Bastille Day!!!!

Gerard Mc Keon and Joyce Brooks.  Photo by:  Rose Billings/Blacktiemagazine.com

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